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20130121
20130129
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CSPAN2 35
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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm EST
. at the university of pennsylvania today to talk to her about this book. the nets is commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> is started in 1957. president eisenhower had had a lot of discussions with the secretary of state about the way the united states was seen around the world because of a lot of the racism that was going on and people here about and read about. the fact that this seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening and whether it was launching or some kind of discrimination that was taking place in the country so that the idea was eisenhower said that he was going to ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission which would put the facts on top of the table. i am told by one of the people who was at the meeting that he sent the table and said another going to put the facts on top of the table. and commissions, as we know, who do policy sometimes set up because their is a tough problem and people don't want to do anything about it. this set up a commission
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:00pm EST
written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 4:00pm EST
commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 9:00pm EST
on the civil rights agenda with access to the white house and for congress, all of that was contingent not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: he was very upset on the stands he took because he felt weak handled civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me as i am up for the reelection you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: now will understand what courage it took to take the stand she did, and i understand more about why she hesitated coretta didn't hesitate. she was involved in the entire war movement but she wasn't a public figure so she could send her to a centrally speak for him. >> host: and again history proves dr. king right. >> guest: this is one of the ways in which i think that he is a visionary. i think that he understood the connection between the anticolonial movements that were going on around the world, and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing that we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anticolonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the a
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 2:00pm EST
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 5:00pm EST
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 12:00pm EST
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:00am EST
did lose. but for king he interested everything he accomplished with civil-rights was the white house and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go in
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 9:00pm EST
that is powerful and does show up among civil rights activists. the more i looked a connection with russia nuia it is more widespread. think of rosa parks they all had garvey connections. there is a picture of african-american in politics that is much more complicated than we want to acknowledge. we have come to terms with our past by constructing a narrative about house slavery ends and freedom is ultimately realized so the civil-rights movement becomes the crucial and point*. and episodes, a people's movements that don't fit into better very problematic. also the scholars across the political spectrum who have an investment to deny it to. i had a lot of push back of anything i have written written, that part of what i discovered, the movement is still alive, there is a chapter in philadelphia, i organized a conference three years ago, a scholarly conference on nuia but at the last minute i advertise it in the local newspaper and 150 garvey-ites showed up. >> host: what is the garvey-ites political focus? >> guest: nuia, there are some chapters, the one in philadelphia, some in the united stat
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 2:00pm EST
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 7:00pm EST
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 1:00am EST
of the civil right lawyer. tell me about your book. >> guest: my book is a collective pieing agraph of six african-american civil rights lawyers who practiced law during the era of segregation and it's about their struggles with civil rights and racial identity. at it about the fact that to be an african-american civil rights lawyer in this era, argue in the book, is to be caught between the black and who it world. both blacks and whites want things of these lawyers and identify with these lawyers. so, to be this kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him, was not just an african-american lawyer but member caught between the black and white world. >> host: how difficult for an african-american to become a lawyer at that time. >> guest: it's not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to good to law school like everybody everybody else, which does cost money, but it's difficult to be a lawyer because no african-american lawyer in this period is going to have white clients or very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have money and if you have money and yo
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:30pm EST
you very much. >> thank you. >> now the daughter of civil rights leaders martin luther king jr. and st. john's scott king desert rose in the life and legacy of coretta space king. she talks with books of america the publishers' trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice, who was scott bagley? >> well the sister of coretta scott king. >> and your mother. >> yes, my mother, so my aunt. he and my mother grew up in alabama together obviously and she later became a john notte professor. she founded the university in pennsylvania. so, a very lively woman. and unfortunately passed last year in june after completing the book. >> so this book is desert rose, the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt. when did she write this book? >> welcome it was a journey that began with my mother's request to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threatened she was confirmed she wouldn't be lost and wanted people to know she wasn't just the life of martin luther king jr. and mother of children but the role in the movement and very much an a
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:00am EST
you drag us back? about free civil-rights america. are we different now? is put in what way? had recanted you to push ourselves as exclusive as we can? but listening not just talking. but the atf to live to the other person's shoes. but use of portion of the five. that is what produce the first black president there browning of the electorate that that fear and anxiety is legitimate and we all need to leave cognizant and listen to the side to find the common ground to where we can feel good to what is possible. especially collectivity. >> host: what you teach? >> guest: i am a filmmaker so right now we focus on graduate courses that films can be a medium for scholarship. for those that write these books but if you make a film then everybody would see the project. that is the incentives but it might allow you if you use film to tell a story it might allow you to say different things about the world. but a visual dissertation to think about producing knowledge these images and sound account as scholarship the way a journal article would count not just the public scholarship. we do
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 5:00pm EST
do we do with our civil liberty rights? and what do we do with our troop levels? there are a lot of issues that could have divided us and we had the type of debate that i think was in the best interest of the united states senate and cleated that bill in -- and we completed that bill in a timely way. i think the way the two of you were able to come forward, there are a lot of other committees -- i serve on the senate foreign relations committee, we talked today during -- yesterday during -- and senator mccain you're also on that committee -- we talked to secretary clinton. wouldn't it be nice to get a state department authorization bill on the floor of the united states senate? mr. mccain: it's a disgrace that we haven't, in how many years? mr. cardin: it's been a long tievmentime. i haven't been in the senate since that happened. we have a better opportunity now. if our committee can mark up a defense authorization -- maybe it'll take a week or two, and you're right, maybe we'll have to work on friday, saturday, over the weekend to get it done. we should do that. but we now have
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:30am EST
very much. >> now bernice king the daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king jr. and coretta scott king discusses the recently published biography of her mother. desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king. she talked with booktv at bookexpo america publishing's annual trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice king who is edith scott dagley? >> guest: at edith scott bickley -- coretta scott king was the wife of martin luther king jr. -- cohost land your mother. >> guest: yes my mother so she was my aunt. she and my mother grew up in alabama together and she later became a drama professor. in fact she founded the drama department at the state university. she was a very lively woman and unfortunately passed last year in june. after completing this book. >> this book is desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt eva scott dagley? when did she write this book lacks. >> guest: well it was a journey that began with my mother's requested 1966 to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threaten
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30am EST
tarheel. and the civil rights movement at that time was working towards getting a public accommodations law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 11:00pm EST
there was a woman at the "washington post" i knew well who was taken off the prized civil-rights assignment at the post because the people that were involved in this civil rights protest were going to have meetings here at the press club and because women were not allowed in the press club they were complaining about this and said we will find a man for this. that's the way things work to the estimate was your beat the "washington post"? >> i have a variety of beads at the washington post. i covered the suburbs in the city of alexandria and covered the course general sessions that was now the superior court and i covered welfare and i covered education, the d.c. public schools. i was on the metro staff. >> totally were you a reporter for the post that the university of maryland following the field for a long time. what is the difference now for the female reporters in the 1960's and 70's? >> there is a difference of course. i still at the university of maryland. i am a graduate director of the college of journalism. we men have many more opportunities now than man but i still think it's har
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 12:00pm EST
functioning of our -- of our country. i mention in particular the long, long struggle for civil rights and how that was held up by a small minority which happened to be in my party, by the way, at that time. but nonetheless, the senate through the years has really been the chamber that takes a long and hard look at legislation, where we have the right to amend, where we have the right to discuss and to embark upon discourse on legislation in a manner that allows even the smallest state, the smallest state to be able to be represented as much as a large state. not true in the body that both the occupant of the chair and i used to serve in in the house because there, as you know, large states can dominate because they have got most of the members. but here, the senator from connecticut is just as important as a senator from california or a senator from iowa, or, let's see, what's the least popular state, wyoming, i think, maybe or alaska is equal to a senator from new york or florida or texas or cal. so this has been the great equalizing body. and so having served here for this time, i think i h
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 8:00pm EST
civil rights leader who is committed her life to extending the promise of our nation's founding principles to all americans. mrs. everies will lead us in the invocation. [cheering and applause] america, we are here, our nation's capitol, on this day january 21st, 2013. the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the sense of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, woman kind, allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the world of belief, this is my country, let us act point meanings that everyone is included. may the inherit dignity and inailble rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these floorish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and fifty years af
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:00pm EST
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 9:00am EST
well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink with me, i'm down here to have one with you and they disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year that the civil rights bill wa
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 11:00pm EST
senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill of 1968 was passed. i have discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do but there was a time when senator baker said he was centered since office the man who had the job as senator mcconnell now has, he was a republican leader then and he said he heard the telephone rang and there was more than one into the conversation but senator dirksen was saying no mr. present i cannot come down and have an drink with you. i did that last night and -- is very unhappy with me. that was a conversation but 30 minutes later there was a rustle in the outer office in the republican leader's office the very office that senator mcconnell now holds and two beagles followed by the present united states came in and lyndon johnson the presence of their puppy and leader if you want have a drink with me i am down here to have one with you and they disappeared into the backroom for 45 minutes. the point of all that is not their socializing. the point was it was then that republican leaders offic
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 5:00pm EST
to protecting our citizens from harm, guarding against civil rights violations in combating guns, gang and drug fueled violence that's too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is were up against. not only because your alarmist statistics are the news stories, but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize, as i do -- most importantly, you recognize, as i do come up in a public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need to secure the results that are community deserves on our own. this is particularly true when it comes to gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every time represented here and about which many view have long been passionate. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room has joined with those of us in the justice department to support law-enforcement and strengthen anti-violence initiatives, especially as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horrific event in newton, connecticut. you've heard from citizens and colleagu
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
and efferent dirksen on civil rights. that would not have happened if the government hadn't been divided and it wouldn't have been as easily accepted by the american people if it had not been divided. if this democratic president and mixture of republicans and democrats in congress say to the american people, we got a real fiscal cliff for you. all the programs that you depend on to pay your medical bills aren't going to have enough money to pay them, and we're going to have to make some changes to deal with that, people won't accept that, especially if it comes from both of us. and as far as who's supposed to propose it, well, senator corker and i proposed it. but we're not president. and we're not president. and i don't know what the governor of virginia's 1350er7bs experience was, but if i waited, we'd still be driving on dirt roads. the legislate,all 535 of us will say, no, mr. president, we couldn't possibly do it that way. let's do it ail bit different and we'll come to a result. that's the way our system works. we got three months to do it. i hope that the republican leader will c
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the result our communities deserve on our own. that is particularly true about gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every count represented here and about which many of you have been passionate advocates. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room have joined with those of us in the justice department who support what enforcement and strengthen anti violence initiatives especially in recent years as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horse events i
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 6:00am EST
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:30pm EST
for solving the unsolved civil rights crimes or worked with a guy that was actually trying to do that and i blocked it until i could make it effective was demonized, but those words hurt, but they are not true. so if you feel good about yourself, you know, try to do the right thing even though it means you're going to take all sorts of hits. the crime, all of the big fox network people came after me because i held that up until we had a clearer oversight and we could see what we were doing. i have several areas like that. but i'm kind of used to doing it. i'm pretty careful. i think every penny that we spend ought to be spent right. i don't think we ought to waste a penny so i don't mind seeking heat asking questions and taking the time to try to figure out where we are going to spend the money and whether or not it is to be spent effectively and whether or not we will have the transparency to see whether it is spent effectively. >> host: tom coburn as in his second term as a senator to read this is your final term. why is this up? >> guest: 16. >> host: and no way you are going to run agai
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 3:00pm EST
right into this. decades after the civil war ended, katherine stone, who we see on the screen, published her memoirs of what she called the gay busy life. that she and her wealthy slave-owning family had led on their 1200-acre plantation in prewar louisiana. the members of her family, she recalled, -- her words -- there was always something going on. formal dining, spend the days, evening parties, riding frolics, fox hunts, and to assist with these and other diversions, katherine added her family had -- again, her words -- quite a corps of servants to keep us well waited on since, naturally, no one expected to wait on himself. katherine stone's younger brothers also -- again her words -- owned a little darky in the quarters who eventually become his body servant. and to generate the wealth that sustained the stone family's life of, again, her words -- luxurious ease, some 150 enslaved human beings toiled in the plantation's cotton and cane field, six days a week, week after week, month after month, year after year. the civil war's outbreak in april of 1861 signaled the beginning of the e
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 8:00am EST
, of interest. it's even a science fiction story. because what we're dealing here really when you come right down to it is the meeting of two alien civilizations after 70 years of the soviet period. the oil industry in particular grew up in almost complete isolation from the west, and this is virtually a unique case. we have other places where oil industries have grown up, where oil industries are run by national oil companies, but in almost every case -- in fact in every case -- these industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 1920s on at any rate or for all practical purposes the oil industry was home grown and developed its own culture, its own civilization even as the soviet union did with its own language and its own culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that of a people who decided that capitalism didn't work, so it's as though they all piled into a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a completely different civilization
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 9:00am EST
's rights around the world, engaging with civil society, and restoring and maintaining american influence at a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last drink would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next, over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice, because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we passed an operation bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here, i guess our third hearing, to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources. we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we are did you to come back again. i realized that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time, and do the hearing that i would like to have, which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the secured of our diplomats depends on the host country. this is all a discussi
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 7:30am EST
. right here. >> thank you, bill. >> you're in washington, d.c. at the time when the capitol is focused on several foreign policies and national security crisis in greece's immediate future. there's a syrian civil war and the refugee crisis in turkey, there's the growing threat of iranian nuclear ambition with the nuclear capacity aiming toward europe, and of course the emergence of the al qaeda and islamist in libya and algeria. the united states and greece have been nato allies for sixty years. greece's defense expenditures will likely drastically reduced because of the crisis you've been describing here. how do you see them contributing to the international security in the years ahead? thank you. >>if i understand you correctly how greece can contribute to europe. for a stability for -- for most stability. greece is a country that finds itself or that borders countries that are in a state of flux. it is a country that the european union and nato from our perspective is that greece needs to be bridge of friendship and stability in the area. of course, greece cannot face and solve a se
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 12:00pm EST
of student educational civil rights and consumer organizations support this bill. i hope we can move forward with legislation this year. it's time to restore fairness to our bankruptcy code when it comes to student debt. let me be clear. when used appropriately, student loans are valuable and important. i wouldn't be standing here today if i hadn't borrowed money from the federal government to go to college and law school. i never could have afforded it otherwise. it was called the national defense education act. if i told you the numbers that i borrowed, you will realize how old i am. at the time it was scary to have that much debt come fresh out of law school. i paid it back just like i was supposed to so the next generation could take over. but what i faced, the debt that i had incurred to go to school and law school doesn't even come close to match what many students have to borrow in the first semester. and that unfortunately leads to a debt that some will be prushed with for a lifetime. unfortunately, there are far too many americans who have been steered into high-cost private loans t
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